Tag Archives: lupin flour

Lupin Protein Bread

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Anyone who follows Chocolate Chilli Mango on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram …

wait!  hey, that’s a great idea … do it!  🙂

But, yes, if you do, you will have noticed a steady stream of photos about all the fantastic chocolates I’ve made in my chocolates and pralines classes over recent weeks.  I’ve had a blast, but I’ll leave all the gushing about chocster heaven for another time … or the Facebook page, Twitter and Instagram (see??? do it!)

Spending all day slaving over a tank of chocolate, sometimes several, making fillings, molding and dipping does not make you crave chocolate.  It leaves you seriously hungry for some substantial healthy fare.   So I’m still eating healthy and making my protein breads every few days.   I was so taken by the success of making muffins with lupin flour and I’m still getting requests for low carb baking that I thought, why not a full on, no holds barred, take no prisoners lupin bread?   Would it work?  Would it be better than those wimpy attempts at adding lupin flour to wheat bread you can buy in the supermarket?

Would it also be gluten-free?  Yeast free?  With no added vegetable oils or icky ingredients?

Would it be high in dietary fibre?  High in protein?  Low in fat just as a bonus?

Could I possibly make it delicious?

Is brilliant too strong a word?  I’d be going for genius but hey, let’s be humble.  This is brilliant!

The lupini bean is a legume and has been identified as a potential allergen, as are peanuts and other legumes.  If you have a peanut or legume allergy, you might want to exercise caution.  However, if you are OK with lupini beans and lupin flour, this bread is fantastic.

It’s got a light open texture and a lovely sweet nutty flavour.  The colour is amazing, almost as golden as polenta!  I used egg whites in the recipe, but if you use whole organic free-range eggs, you might want to don a pair of sunglasses before slicing into this yummy loaf.

This bread is fantastic with both sweet and savoury foods.  I’m currently enjoying it with cheese, both hard and soft cheeses, including ricotta and cottage cheese and sharp grana padano.  It is delicious topped with butter, nut butters, jams, yoghurt and fresh fruit, salad and chicken, mustard, salmon, grilled vegetables, bacon, eggs, anything.

As I’d just opened a fresh pack of hemp seeds, I threw a few in to the loaf.  OK, now we’re tipping the scales into genius territory … it works.  It is sensational to be honest.  I’m guessing you could use chia, pumpkin, flax, or any seeds you like and it would work.  Just for extra goodness and some texture and flavour.

If you are low-carbing, and I know many of you are in your quest to lose body fat in 2013 (don’t cave, it’s only January!), then this bread could be for you.

I hope you enjoy it.  I’m loving it.

Seriously, I’m never buying bread again.  It’s just too easy and delicious to make a gluten-free loaf full of goodness at home.

Go ahead, make this bread!

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Makes 1 loaf  (21cm x 10cm loaf tin)

Ingredients
315 grams egg whites (or 6 large eggs)
110 grams lupin flour (I use this one)
35 grams unflavoured whey protein isolate (I used Professional Whey NZ WPI or substitute whey concentrate, or rice protein)
15 grams coconut flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Optional Additions:
20 grams hulled hemp seeds or substitute about two tablespoons of chia, flax, pumpkin, or sesame seeds, or whatever you like.

*If you prefer to make this bread without protein powders added, simply omit the whey protein from the recipe.  Substitute an extra 35 grams of lupin flour or 12 grams of coconut flour instead.

Directions
Preheat the oven to 180℃.

Grease a loaf tin lightly with coconut oil spray (or PAM) or line the tin with silicone paper, if not using a silicon mold.

Add all the ingredients to a large mixing bowl and mix or whisk together until blended and the batter is smooth.   The batter will be fairly thin but the whey and coconut flour will absorb a great deal of moisture during baking.

Transfer to the prepared loaf tin and bake for 25 to 30 minutes until risen and golden and a skewer, inserted into the centre, comes out clean.  Do not over bake this bread or the loaf will dry out.

Remove from the oven and cool on a wire rack.  Store, well wrapped, in a freezer bag in the fridge or freezer.  It will last for up to a week, stored in the refrigerator.  It will last longer if you slice it and store, wrapped, in the freezer.

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Macronutrient Profile
I have included macros for both the plain and hemp seed versions, with all macros based on the ingredients as stated.

I used egg whites for this recipe, but obviously whole eggs will work extremely well.  Whole eggs would also provide a host of more micronutrients and make this bread even more golden, if that is possible!

Lupin Protein Bread_macros_plain version

Plain Version

with Hemp Seeds

with Hemp Seeds

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Filed under All Recipe Posts, Breads & Quickbreads, Low Carb, Protein, Protein Bread, Special Diet

Apricot Almond Low Carb Muffins

Apricot Almond LC Muffins_6062_wm_1x1I get so many requests for low carbohydrate recipes, I wish I had a dollar for every time I get asked.  I’d be a bazillionaire!  It does speak volumes about the popularity of low carb diets though.  For some, it’s about losing body fat and maybe some weight.  For others, it’s a lifestyle choice due to health factors like Type II diabetes, food intolerances, or carb sensitivity.  For others, it just makes them feel good.

Whatever the reason, there is no need to feel as though one has to miss out much on foods that are typically high carbohydrate.  Breads, cakes, snacks … there are so many options.  Nut flours and lower carb flours make life more nutritious and lower carb without deprivation.

One such flour that is gaining popularity but is perhaps less well-known, is lupin flour.  Lupins are a legume and popular in some Mediteranean cuisines.  Unlike many other legumes, lupins are quite low in carbohydrates while containing healthy omega fatty acids, a whopping dose of dietary fibre, and they pack a solid punch of protein.  There has been a lot of commotion about the potential for lupin flour use in breads to boost nutrition and give greater satiety thereby aiding weight loss, as well as it’s ability to help lower cholesterol and provide a range of nutrients.  Bread makers are starting to make lupin flour breads and they are gaining in popularity.  That’s all good.

But ultimately, I say yay because it’s high in protein, low in fat and carbs and high in dietary fibre.

Lupin beans are about 45% protein and 30% dietary fibre, and have negligble carbohydrate.  That is awesome.

100 grams of lupin flour contains:

1365kJ / 362kCals
39 grams protein
5.5 grams fat (0.1 gram saturated)
11.5 grams carbohydrates (2.9 grams sugars)
31.3 grams dietary fibre

It is also gluten-free.

For.  The.  Win.

Right?

On the downside, being a legume, it is likely that it may cause problems if you happen to react to FODMAPS, specifically fructans and galactans.  In particular, it’s likely to contain galactans as most legumes do.  I have yet to see it on a list of FODMAP foods, but it’s a reasonable assumption.  But that is not to say that it will cause someone a problem.  These things are highly individual.  So it might be worth checking out.

OK.  So, how does this lupin flour bake up then?  Well,  I like to go easy early on trying out a new flour so I went for muffins.  I’ve wanted to make my mum some low carb healthy muffins and these really hit the spot.  She likes her muffins fruity and is a big fan of the wheat free muffins I make for her, especially those with almond flour.  They have a lovely fall-apart, flourless texture but are not heavy or stodgy.

Apricots are in season now and apricots and almonds are a great combination.  You could substitute whatever fruit you like but be aware of the impact on the carbohydrate count.  One usually discounts fruit when thinking about a low carb option but these muffins prove you can enjoy a fruity muffin without a carbohydrate blow out.  Alternatively, you could leave out the fruit and just make them vanilla, or add some chopped up 100% chocolate or spices, or anything else you fancy that meets your low carb requirements.

Great, so where do I buy this lupin flour, CCM?  Well, I don’t know about elsewhere but here in Australia, Lotus Foods make a really good lupin flour that is widely available in health food and organic shops.  I have yet to see it in a supermarket but I suspect it’s only a matter of time.  You can also get it online.

I have used a granulated stevia based sweetener in place of sugar.  You can substitute your preferred sweetener, knowing that the amount in the recipe is equal to the same amount of sugar, so please substitute accordingly.

They are sugar-free, gluten-free, lower in fat than most muffins, and have a good dose of protein per serve, without adding any protein powders.  These are not suitable for a low FODMAP diet, however, but watch this space … I also follow a low FODMAP diet so the likelihood of a suitable version is high 🙂

They taste fantastic!  I hope you enjoy them too.

Macros are provided below the recipe, as always 🙂
Apricot Almond LC Muffins_6065_wm_1x1

Makes 10

Ingredients
80 grams almond meal
100 grams lupin flour
65 grams Natvia (or substitute your preferred sweetener or sugar, equal to 65g sugar)
2 teaspoons baking powder
140 grams apricots (2 large), diced
2 large eggs
125 millilitres almond milk (or substitute your preferred milk)
1/2 teaspoon vanilla bean paste

Directions
Preheat the oven to 180ºC.  Line 10 muffin molds with muffin liners and set aside.
Mix together the almond meal, lupin flour, sweetener, and baking powder in a bowl.  Make sure you break up any lumps.  Toss in the diced apricots.

Whisk together the eggs, almond milk, and vanilla bean paste.  Add the wet ingredients to the dry mixture and mix lightly with a fork.  It’s okay if the mixture is a little lumpy as these are muffins.  Do not over mix the batter.  Pour the batter into the 10 lined muffin tins.
Bake for 25 to 30 minutes until risen, golden, and a skewer inserted comes out clean.
Cool on a wire rack before turning out.
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Macronutrient Profile
I have included macros for the recipe as stated above.  Any variations and substitutions will, of course, vary the macros to some degree.

Apricot Almond LC Muffins_macros.jpg
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11 Comments

Filed under All Recipe Posts, Breakfast, Fruit, Muffins, Nuts, Protein, Protein Muffins, Special Diet