Tag Archives: low-FODMAP

Macadamia & Wattle Seed Butter

Macadamia Wattle Seed Butter_6089_wm_1x1

I have not posted anything in a couple of weeks and for this I apologise.  I have a number of things I would dearly love to bake, make, and post for you but life has again placed itself in my path.  But I will return to baking very soon.

As some of you know, I have attended some fantastic courses in making chocolates and pralines at the brilliant Savour Chocolate & Patisserie School in Melbourne.  I have had the time of my life and I have learned so much.  It’s been so great, I have signed up for some more classes!  If you would like to see some of the amazing chocolates and pralines we made, you can view them on the Facebook page.

But it has taken me away from baking and playing in my kitchen and posting new recipes.  Over recent weeks my father has been unwell and so I’ve been distracted by that too.  But I will be getting back to business as usual this week so there should be some posts coming through very soon.

I had some wonderful ideas for recipes to post for Australia Day, which is today.  Some wickedly good and some wickedly healthy too.  But as I’ve not had time to make them in time, I thought I should at least post up something to commemorate today.

Unlike some, I do not think of Australia Day as a commemoration of our early European (English) settlers arriving by ship over 200 years ago.  I think of it as a day to celebrate the coming together of Australians as a nation.  Strictly speaking, Australia became a nation on 1 January 1901 so this anniversary is a few weeks behind, but hey, what’s a few weeks between friends?

Like any nation, there are moments in our history of which we can be proud and moments that make us hang our heads in shame.  There are some who claim that those who migrated here from other parts of the world since the 1780s are not truly Australian, that only the indigenous people of our nation have the right to call themselves Australian.  I believe that all of us who call this beautiful country home have the right to call ourselves Australian, for even our indigenous Australians crossed over from other lands, albeit thousands of years ago.  We are essentially all migrants and yet all Australian, and all fortunate to live in such a beautiful country.   As is often said, we are all different but underneath it all, we are human and we are all the same.

It occurred to me earlier today that although the recipe I’m sharing is simple, and hardly even worth a blog post … it brings together two quintessentially Australian foods.   Macadamia nuts and wattle seeds.
Both foods are indigenous to Australia.  They are both amazingly delicious as well as being healthy.  Macadamia nuts are fully of healthy mono-unsaturated fats and nutrients while wattle seeds punch above their weight in protein and micronutrients.  Together they are nothing short of divine.

Whether you process the macadamias raw or lightly roasted is purely up to you, and a matter of personal taste.  I prefer to process them raw as the flavour is delicate and beautiful, and a pinch of sea salt really adds depth.

Anyone who has trawled through the recipes on this site will know that I love roasted wattle seeds.  That magical chocolate-hazelnut-coffee flavour they impart is sublime.   They are available online for those of you outside Australia.  If you cannot find them, you could substitute a little pure vanilla.  Use vanilla seeds or vanilla bean paste for the best flavour.

This literally takes only a few minutes to prepare.  It is the shizz on toast, on vegetables, on fish, on fruit, or eaten with a spoon.  It makes a fantastic alternative to butter, or other nut butters 🙂

Wishing you all a very Happy Australia Day.  I will see you all really soon with some new recipes!

Makes 1 x 250 gram jar

Ingredients
250 grams macadamias, raw and unsalted
1 – 1 1/2 teaspoons roasted and ground wattle seeds
sea salt q.b.

Directions
If you wish to roast the macadamias first, lightly roast them for 5 – 8 minutes at 180℃.  Keep an eye on them and move them about on the tray every couple of minutes.  Allow to cool completely before proceeding.  This step is optional and unnecessary but it’s a matter of personal preference for flavour.  I like to make my macadamia butter raw as I like the flavour.

Place the macadamias in the bowl of a food processor and process until it is processed to a smooth paste.  Add a generous pinch of sea salt, to taste.  Add the wattle seeds and pulse briefly to distribute.  Transfer the butter to a clean jar.

Stored in the refrigerator, it will keep for a long time.  I doubt that will be necessary though 😉

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Filed under All Recipe Posts, Fillings, Jams & Preserves, Low Carb, Nuts, Special Diet

Banana Chocolate Protein Bars

Banana PB Protein Bars_6040_wm_1x1

It’s time … remember I made those Strawberry Ripe protein bars a while ago, using freeze-dried fruit?  They are the bomb.

The thing with protein bars is that you really want to be able to pack them into your lunch box or bag or wherever you keep your snacks or post workout stuff when you are on the go.  That is what makes freeze-dried fruit so amazing.  You get a big flavour punch from whole fresh fruit (no additives) and all the goodness, but they’re not perishable as fresh fruit tends to be, right?  Plus, when ground into a powder, they help make the texture of your protein bar fantabulous and your bar can travel more safely with you.

There is mounting evidence on this blog of my love adoration worship of banana and chocolate together.  I know a lot of you share this love.  So here is one of my simple, fast, but absolutely yummilicious protein bars.  Nothing fancy, just a banana bar with some oats and a dollop of peanut butter, coated in 100% dark chocolatey goodness.

I have never tried it but I would guess you could substitute banana chips for the freeze-dried banana.  Or simply use a good quality banana flavoured whey protein, although you won’t really get that real banana flavour.  I’ve actually made these bars using only unflavoured whey as well as a combination of unflavoured and banana flavoured whey.  Both are great.  I did not add any sweetener as the banana is sweet enough for my taste.  If you use a flavoured whey, it will already be sweetened so take that into account.

The small amount of peanut butter in the bar does not give the bars a strong PB flavour.  If you want a stronger flavour you can add more but you will have to add more oats to balance out the texture and use less almond milk.  Alternatively, a small amount of peanut flour (if you can get it!!) would be great.

They are sticky but that’s what makes them so awesome when you eat them.  The texture is not dry.  They are delicious and almost creamy!  If you don’t like chocolate, finely chop up some dry roasted peanuts and roll the bars in that to coat them for a Banana PB bar.  Wow.

I love using Willie’s Cacao 100% Chef’s Cacao for this, especially the Madagascan Sambirano Superior.  But a good Pralus 100% or any good 85% plus bar will do.  The intensity of the thin chocolate coating with the banana protein filling is amazing.

If you love the idea but not the fruit, substitute another favourite freeze-dried fruit or even coconut.  Just remember that all these changes will impact the macros one way or another.

I hope you love these.  They are one of my favourite post workout bars.  I gave a piece to my father to see if he could tell it was a protein bar … he thought they were banana chocolates!

That has to be worth points on some scoreboard somewhere 😀

Store them in the refrigerator or even freeze them if you are so inclined.  Wrap them up and pop into your lunch or workout bag.  I love them straight from the fridge on a hot day.

Macros are included below.

Enjoy!

Banana PB Protein Bars_6027_wm_1x1

Makes 4 bars

Ingredients
40 grams freeze-dried banana* (I used Absolute Fruitz)
70 grams unflavoured or banana flavoured whey protein isolate**
30 grams rolled oats (gluten-free, if required)
25 grams 100% peanut butter (or peanut flour
20 – 30 millilitres almond milk (I used 30 ml.  You could also substitute coconut or other non-dairy milk)
40 grams 100% chocolate, for enrobing the bars (or q.b. … this is about what I used to coat them all over)
sweetener, to taste (optional)

*If you cannot get freeze-dried banana, try using banana chips!

**I’ve tried this with 70 grams of this one and a combination of 40 grams of this with 30 grams of this one.  The latter gave an extra banana oomph.  You could substitute with peanut butter flavoured whey, if you can get that too.

Directions
Place the freeze-dried banana in the bowl of a food processor and process until finely ground.  Add the whey and rolled oats, and process until the mixture is fine.

Add the peanut butter, almond milk, and sweetener (if using) and process until the mixture comes together.   It will be fairly sticky.  Toss in a little extra whey powder or oat or peanut flour, if required.  Cover and refrigerate until it firms up.  Divide the mixture into four equal portions and form into bars.   Alternatively, you can immediately divide the mixture into four equal portions and form in to bars and then place on a tray, lined with silicone paper, in the fridge until they firm up enough to coat.  A little trickier than doing it the other way round but it’s up to you.

Place the dark chocolate into a microwave-safe plastic bowl and microwave for about one minute.  It might need another 15 seconds or so.  Stir the mixture until melted.  Keep stirring the mixture as it cools slightly.  You can also melt the chocolate in a heatproof bowl over simmering water (a bain marie).  Once melted, remove from the heat and stir until it cools slightly.

Dip or coat each bar in the chocolate and set on to a tray, lined with silicone paper, to set completely.  You can set the bars at room temperature or place in the refrigerator for ten minutes or so until the chocolate sets.

Now, you can temper the chocolate and coat the bars for a shiny finish with a nice snap to the coating, if you are like me and prefer them this way.  To do this, I generally temper a large quantity of chocolate and use a dipping fork to dip and coat the bars.  I still end up having used about 40 grams of chocolate, as you only need a think layer of chocolate.

Store them in an airtight container in the fridge.  They are great straight from the fridge.  Wrap well if packing into a lunch box or gym bag.

Banana PB Protein Bars_6039_wm_4x5

Macronutrient Profile
I’ve included macros based on the recipe as stated and using the ingredients I specified above.  If you make variations to the bars, you will have to account for those, of course.

Banana PB Protein Bars_macros

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Filed under All Recipe Posts, Chocolate, Protein, Protein Bars, Special Diet

Yuzu & Wattle Seed Protein Cheesecake

Wattleseed Yuzu Protein Cheesecake_5904_wm_4x5

I am running a seven-day diet challenge for myself.  It’s not that much of a challenge, to be honest, but the idea is to set me up so I can enjoy Christmas Day with the family and indulge in a bit of what is really not good for me, without fearing spending Boxing Day feeling below par.

So I’m kind of eating clean, whatever that means 😉

Well, in practice, all that means for me is that I stick to my low fructose and fructan diet 100%, without any random challenges.  I usually run random challenges where I introduce food that I know causes me GI distress, just to see if my situation has improved.  It has, by the way, so I’m happily and, so far, successfully doing science on myself to beat that sucker 😀

But, for at least a week (or until Christmas Day) I want to be 100% on the straight and narrow and along with that, I’m pretty much avoiding even an infrequent treat.  Wait on, that depends on what you consider to be a treat …

I’m still having dessert, people.   I’m even having cheesecake for pity’s sake …

I’m just having healthy desserts and that means another protein cheesecake.  Dare I say, the BEST protein cheesecake ever.   Why?  Let me count the ways … in a truly non-exhaustive list …

  1. It is light and creamy and sweet but has a beautiful tang from the citrus.
  2. It has a wonderful and unusual flavour combination that I’m sure you have not seen in a protein cheesecake before.
  3. The macros for this cheesecake are so freaking fantabulous, I had to quadruple check them this time because I found it so hard to believe.  Looking at the macros, you’d think it should be just rubbish.  It is the opposite of rubbish.  Manna from heaven, that’s what it is 🙂
  4. My mother hates cheesecake.  Perfect test subject.  Loves it.  This cheesecake can win over the cheesecake haters.  Trust me.
  5. Yuzu and wattle seeds are AMAZING.  Alone.  Together.  Yep.  Totally.

I’ll leave it there, shall I?

Some of you would be wondering what the hell is yuzu?

Or you might be thinking I hate yuzu / I can’t buy yuzu juice anywhere / I’m totally indifferent to yuzu and just don’t care.

Yuzu is a wonderful citrus fruit that has a lovely flavour reminiscent of lemons, mandarin and orange, possibly a tang of grapefruit.  It is sweeter than a lemon but still has a lovely astringent finish.  It originated in China but is widely used across Asia, especially in Korea and Japan.    I have not been able to source fresh yuzu fruit so I usually buy imported 100% yuzu juice, made from fresh fruit (not concentrate).    I highly recommend it.  In fact, I’ve used it in several recipes on this blog and many many more.  I love yuzu.  If you cannot find it, simply substitute fresh lemon juice or a combination of lemon and orange or mandarin juice in about a 3:1 ratio.  If you don’t like it, does this mean we cannot be friends anymore? 😉

The other ingredient is another I have used a few times here and many more times besides.  Beside my large stash of cinnamon that I barrel through at a rate of knots, is my trusty jar of ground wattle seeds, an Australian native seed.  Lightly roasted and ground, it has a wonderful aroma and flavour that has hints of hazelnut, coffee and chocolate.  It has to be a pretty perfect food because it’s also packed with nutrients and fibre.    You can buy wattle seed in specialty food shops and some supermarkets in Australia and online, if elsewhere.

Yuzu and wattleseed are a lovely flavour pairing.  Yuzu has a natural affinity for hazelnuts and dark chocolate … come to think of it, those three together are a particular favourite of mine.  It also goes really well with berries and summer stone fruit.  Don’t worry if you substitute lemon … the result will still be amazing.  It also goes rather well in this combination.

If you don’t have any wattle seeds handy and want to make this cheesecake now (of course you do!), it will also be fantastic with poppy seeds.

This is another dessert that you don’t have to make on the side because I can’t have the normal dessert everyone else is having.  When I make this cheesecake, everyone eats it because it’s just as good, if not better.  If you don’t care about making it healthy, feel free to use sugar in place of the stevia sweetener and a full-fat cottage or ricotta cheese along with a full-fat yoghurt or crème fraîche.  You will have yourself an amazing rich and luscious cheesecake.

Serve it with fresh berries, raspberries in particular, or stone fruit, mango, whatever.  Turn that fruit in to a fruit coulis and pour over the top.  Drizzle a little dark chocolate on top, if you like or some crushed roasted hazelnuts, or both.  It makes a great healthy dinner party dessert. 

Never ever make do when it comes to dessert.

On that note, let’s get to that cheesecake.

Wattleseed Yuzu Protein Cheesecake_5902_wm_4x5

Check out the macros.  Yes, they are indeed beyond awesome.  Total fluke, to be honest, but who’s complaining? 😉

Makes 1 x 20cm cheesecake (serves 8)

Ingredients

  • 500 grams low-fat cottage cheese
  • 250 grams thick non-fat Greek yoghurt (I used Chobani 0%)
  • 156 grams eggs (shelled weight, about 3 large)
  • 120 grams stevia blend sweetener (I used Natvia, or substitute your preferred sweetener)
  • 60 grams unflavoured micellar casein (I used Professional Whey)
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon zest, finely zested
  • 80 millilitres 100% yuzu juice OR fresh lemon juice
  • 8 grams (2 teaspoons) ground wattle seeds

Substitutions:

  • You can substitute ricotta, quark, or cream cheese for the cottage cheese.  I prefer the cottage cheese as it gives a lovely light, creamy texture.  I think ricotta makes the best substitution, if you feel you must.
  • If you wish to use poppy seeds, substitute 10 grams of poppy seeds and omit the wattle seeds.
  • To substitute for the yuzu juice, use all lemon juice or a mix of 60mls lemon juice and 20mls orange or mandarin juice.
  • I used Chobani Greek yoghurt, which is especially high in protein and very thick.  If using a different Greek yoghurt, make sure it is thick or strain the yoghurt before using.  You will need about 375 grams of yoghurt to get about 250 grams of yoghurt after straining the liquid.
  • For a rich, indulgent cheesecake, substitute 125 grams sugar for the Natvia, and substitute equivalent quantities of full-fat ricotta or cream cheese for the cottage cheese and full-fat yoghurt or crème fraîche for the non-fat yoghurt.  The rest of the recipe remains the same.

Directions
Preheat the oven to 150℃.

Line a 20 centimetre springform tin with non-stick silicone paper or grease and dust with a little flour (wheat, oat, corn, as desired).  I prefer to line the tin with non-stick paper.  Set aside.

Place the cottage cheese in to the bowl of  a food processor and blend until smooth.  Add the remaining ingredients, except the wattle seeds, and process until smooth.  Add the wattle seeds (or poppy seeds) and pulse for a few seconds only to distribute.

Alternatively, blend the cottage cheese until smooth and transfer to the large bowl of a mixer.  Add the remaining ingredients and mix with the paddle attachment until the batter is smooth.

Transfer the cheesecake batter to the prepared tin and smooth the top.    Bake for 60 to 70 minutes, until set and starting to colour around the edges.  Switch off the oven and leave the cheesecake in the oven, with the door slightly ajar, for a further 20 to 30 minutes, to allow the cheesecake to settle.

Wattleseed Yuzu Protein Cheesecake_5881_wm_4x5

A lot of people get worked up about a slight crack on the surface of the cheesecake.  Seriously, I do not.  I’d probably get cranky if it domed or worse, fell, in the centre and cracked in a bid to erupt its contents as it baked.  But a small crack on a level smooth top?  I’m not that fussed.  I think it adds character. 🙂

Remove and allow to cool to room temperature.  Refrigerate for several hours, covered, before removing from the tin and serving.   It is best served chilled.  Serve with fresh berries or a berry coulis.  Raspberries are particularly lovely with this cheesecake as they match lemon, yuzu, and the wattleseed so well.  Mango would also be lovely and it goes without saying that a little dark chocolate grated on top or in a light chocolate sauce would be awesome.

Store leftovers, covered, in the refrigerator for up to two to three days.

Wattleseed Yuzu Protein Cheesecake_5892_wm_1x1

Macronutrient Profile
The macros provided here relate to the recipe as stated above, for both the yuzu and lemon versions.  Substitutions of other ingredients will change the macros, ranging from a negligible amount (e.g. lemon juice instead of yuzu juice) or dramatically (e.g. using full-fat cream cheese instead of cottage cheese).

Yuzu Wattle Seed Protein Cheesecake_macros

Lemon Wattle Seed Protein Cheesecake_macros

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Filed under All Recipe Posts, Desserts, Fruit, Protein, Protein Cheesecake, Special Diet

Sweet Potato & Rosemary Protein Bread

Sweet Potato Rosemary Protein Bread_5872_wm_5x7

Protein breads are the shizzz.  Well, they are for me.  Seeing as bread and I can’t seem to come to an understanding these days.  But protein breads are awesome.  Plus the possibilities are endless.  Sweet ones, savoury ones, all-purpose ones.   They can be light and airy or hearty and full of nutritionally dense goodness.  I love them.

I tend to steer clear of using yeast for protein breads.   Mostly because I make mine gluten-free and I don’t like using gluten substitutes.  But hey, yeast free is a bonus.  Sure I could set up a sourdough starter but I don’t have the time, inclination, or fridge space for that kind of malarkey anymore.

It is rare for a week to go by in which I don’t make at least one loaf of protein bread.   I like my lower carb ones for daytime as I tend to eat most of my carbohydrates later in the day.  But I do like to have a lower fat, higher carb bread that I can enjoy with my evening meal or an evening snack with cheese.  It is also great as part of a post workout meal.

This savoury bread with sweet potato and rosemary is fantastic with soup, filled with chicken, eggs and vegetables, or anything you like.  It is a great addition to a cheese board too.  What a great idea for Christmas, yes?  It has a proper bread texture and is quite hearty but light.

I hope you enjoy it!  It is free of added gluten, nuts, sugar, yeast, and dairy.   A one-tenth of a loaf serving will give you 93kcals, 12.5g of protein, 0.7g fat (0.1g saturated), 8.3g carbohydrates (1g sugars), and 2.3g of dietary fibre!  That’s pretty awesome by way of macros, isn’t it?

Make it.  Now. 🙂

Makes 1 x 21cm x 10cm loaf

Ingredients

  • 135 grams cooked sweet potato (boiled or baked)
  • 300 grams liquid egg whites (or 4 whole eggs)
  • 90 grams unflavoured rice protein isolate (or substitute micellar casein)
  • 75 grams oat flour (gluten-free or substitute quinoa flour)
  • 15 grams psyllium husks
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons fresh rosemary, finely chopped

Directions
Preheat the oven to 180℃.

Line the loaf tin with non-stick silicone paper or grease and dust with a little oat flour.  Set aside.

Place all the ingredients, except the rosemary, into the bowl of a food processor.  Process until the dough is smooth.  Alternatively, you can puree the sweet potato and combine all the ingredients in the bowl of a mixer and mix on a low to medium speed until the dough is smooth and light.

Stir in the rosemary until well-distributed in the dough.  Transfer the dough to the prepared tin, and bake for about 25 to 30 minutes until cooked through.  Do not over bake the loaf.  Remove from the oven and allow to cool in the tin.

Turn out and slice to serve.  Keeps well for several days if stored wrapped in foil, in a freezer bag, in the refrigerator.

Sweet Potato Rosemary Protein Bread_5875_wm_1x1

Macronutrient Profile

I have provided macros as per the recipe above, using liquid egg whites and rice protein isolate.  If you substitute other ingredients, you will have to account for these changes.

Sweet Potato & Rosemary Protein Bread_macros

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Filed under All Recipe Posts, Protein, Protein Bread, Savouries, Special Diet

Strawberry Ripe Protein Bars

Strawberry Ripe?  Don’t you mean Cherry Ripe?  Don’t you have a thing for Cherry Ripe?  Bounty Bars.  You also like those, right?

Yes, I do have a thing for Cherry Ripe and Bounty Bars … oh wait, you read the blog!  😉   But it’s really hard finding freeze-dried cherries and I just wanted to make something with strawberry.  So I made strawberry ripe protein bars instead.  Or strawberry bounty bars.  Of course, you can make a variety of fruit flavoured coconut bars with this .. so long as it goes well with coconut and chocolate 🙂

These are really good.  REALLY GOOD.

I just wanted to show you that you don’t need flavoured whey to make a great fruit flavoured whey bar.   Sure, you get some extra natural sugars from the fact that these are real strawberries and not artificial strawberry flavouring.   Maybe that doesn’t matter to you.  It matters to me.  I know that it matters to a lot of you too based on the comments you leave on the blog and on the FB page.  It’s all a matter of personal preference but I’m willing to go for real fruit flavour over the fake stuff any day 🙂

Freeze dried fruits are a fantastic invention.  Pulverised, you can use them to flavour anything you like, without adding a lot of calories.  You also get all the micronutrients trapped in the fruit.  They are great as a snack on their own but I love using them to flavour desserts, creams,  protein cheesecakes, protein shakes, and even macaron shells.  I also like making protein bars with them.   I always buy unflavoured protein powders because I prefer to flavour my own, according to whim.  The thought of a large bag of one flavoured whey would freak me out.  It is so limiting!  Along with cacao, spices, lucuma, and other flavourings, freeze-dried fruit, ground to a powder, is a fantastic way to make flavouring your own protein powder easy.  Bonus points for adding extra nutrition, if like me, you care about that stuff.

Let’s hop to it cos these bars aren’t waiting around for anyone 🙂

You can use whatever protein powder you like for these.  I chose my favourite whey protein isolate but whey protein concentrate or casein should work really well too.  Rice protein would also work although the flavour might be a little overpowering.

I used almond milk, just because I prefer it to coconut milk.  You can use any milk you like.  I prefer to use a non-dairy milk so that I can keep this out of the refrigerator longer when I take them to work or if I’m out and about.

Oh yeah, they’re gluten and can be made lactose or dairy free.  There are no tree nuts and they’re OK if you are on a low FODMAP diet, like me.

Enjoy!

Makes 4 large or 8 small bars

Ingredients
60 grams freeze-dried strawberries (I used Absolute Fruitz)
60 grams unsweetened shredded coconut
60 grams unflavoured whey protein powder (I use this one)
1/2 teaspoon vanilla (I used this one)
60 millilitres unsweetened coconut or almond milk (I used almond milk)
80 grams dark chocolate (I like 100% but anything above 70% is good)

Directions
Place the strawberries in the bowl of a food processor and process until finely ground.  Add the coconut and whey, and vanilla, and process until the mixture is fine but not totally ground to a flour.  There may be small pieces of berry or coconut.  This is great as it adds texture.

Add the coconut or almond milk and process until the mixture starts to come together.   Line a bar tin with silicone paper and press the mixture evenly into the tin.  Cover and refrigerate until it firms up.  Alternatively, you can just divide the mixture into 4 or 8 equal portions and form in to bars.  Place on a tray, lined with silicone paper, and refrigerate until they firm up enough to coat.

Place the dark chocolate into a plastic bowl and microwave for about one minute.  It might need another 15 seconds or so.  Stir the mixture until melted.  Keep stirring the mixture as it cools slightly.  You can also melt the chocolate in a heatproof bowl over simmering water (a bain marie).  Once melted, remove from the heat and stir until it cools slightly.

Coat each bar in the chocolate and set on to a tray, lined with silicone paper, to set completely.  You can set the bars at room temperature or place in the refrigerator for ten minutes or so until the chocolate sets.

Now, you can temper the chocolate well and coat the bars with a smooth finish if you are like me and prefer them this way.

Not everyone really cares about that so you can just spoon or spread the chocolate on to each bar to coat, for a rough finish, like the bars below.  Does it make a difference?  Well, sure, they look a little different but tastewise?  Slightly different texture for the chocolate but basically the same.  Of course. 😀

Feast your eyes on the strawberry coconut and chocolate goodness.

Strawberry Ripe or maybe even a Strawberry Bounty Bar?  You decide.  Either way, they taste fantastic!

Macronutrient Profile
I’ve included macros based on the recipe as stated and using the ingredients I have specifically used.   I based the chocolate macro counts on Lindt Excellence 85%  as it is an easily sourced dark chocolate and strikes a balance between the 100% and a mellow 70% 🙂

If you use a 100% cacao, the fat will creep up slightly and carbohydrates and sugars will decrease a bit.  So I used the 85% as a guideline for the 70% – 100% range.

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Filed under All Recipe Posts, Protein, Protein Bars, Special Diet