Coconut Protein Bread

Coconut Protein Bread_6050_wm_1x1

More protein bread.  More protein recipes.  Well, yes.  Part of me getting off to a good start in 2013.  This is good, yes? 🙂

Also, there are likely to be some traditional dessert type recipes cropping up here soon, what with the merry-go-round of birthdays and such that will start in a few weeks here at home.  Plenty of time for that … so for now, I’m going to share with you some more of what forms part of my daily repast.

Coconut bread.  Coconut Protein Bread to be precise.  A low-fat and moderate carbohydrate bread that is both high in fibre and protein.   It is great with both savoury and sweet toppings so a good basic protein bread to have on hand.  Easy to make, you just throw in all your ingredients and off you go.

This bread does contain protein powder and I know some of you have asked “Well, I don’t use protein powder so can I substitute more flour or something else in its place?”  The answer is YES, YOU CAN.  In this bread you can substitute more coconut flour for the protein powder and still have bread that is relatively high in protein and delicious.

This is great toasted and spread with some coconut butter or fresh butter.  It also makes a lovely French toast, topped with Greek yoghurt and fresh fruit, made into sandwiches, and is amazing topped with your favourite healthy chocolate spread or some melted and drizzled 100% chocolate.   Serve it with fish or chicken dishes or your favourite curry, anything that loves coconut.  It has a distinctive coconut flavour and a light texture.

Coconut Protein Bread_6058_wm_1x1

Served warm, with coconut butter 😀

It is a proper bread though, not a cake baked in a loaf tin, OK?  This is not cake, people.  So for those of you who want something sweet instead, I have included the Sweet Coconut Bread version as well.  For those of you who want a gluten-free bread to eat as proper bread, make toast and bread shenanigans, this is for you.

The macros are included below the recipe as usual.   It is gluten-free and suitable for anyone following a low fructose and fructan diet.  If you substitute for the protein powder, it will also be lactose free.

Ignore the photography as I’ve had to take these photos at night and we all know that always ends in tears, mostly mine 😉

Enjoy!

Makes 1 small loaf  (21cm x 10cm loaf tin)

Ingredients
156 grams egg whites (or 3 large eggs)
156 grams whole eggs (3 large eggs)
55 grams coconut flour
20 grams unflavoured whey protein isolate (I used Professional Whey NZ WPI or rice protein)*
20 grams unflavoured micellar casein (I used Professional Whey Micellar Casein or rice protein)*
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 – 3/4 teaspoon sea salt

*If you prefer to make this bread without protein powders added, simply omit the whey and casein powders from the recipe.  Substitute an extra 25 grams of coconut flour instead.

Directions
Preheat the oven to 180℃.

Grease a loaf tin lightly with coconut oil spray (or PAM) or line the tin with silicone paper, if not using a silicon mold.

Add all the ingredients to a large mixing bowl and mix or whisk together until blended and the batter is smooth.   Transfer to the prepared loaf tin and bake for 25 to 30 minutes until risen and a skewer, inserted into the centre, comes out clean.  Do not over bake this bread or the loaf will dry out.

Remove from the oven and cool on a wire rack.  Store, well wrapped, in a freezer bag in the fridge or freezer.  It will last for up to a week, stored in the refrigerator.

Coconut Protein Bread_6053_wm_1x1 Coconut Protein Bread_6051_wm_1x1

Variation: Sweet Coconut Bread
This is a more cake-like bread and is richer from the addition of fats and sweetener.  You can add chocolate chips or chunks to this sweet bread, shredded coconut, or some fresh berries, banana, mango, or passionfruit, or any fruit that goes well with coconut for you.

Ingredients
As per the recipe for Coconut Bread but with the following additions and substitutions:

125 millilitres extra virgin coconut oil, melted
65 grams coconut sugar (or honey, coconut nectar, or your preferred sweetener, to taste)
1/2 teaspoon sea salt only
1/2 teaspoon vanilla or 2 teaspoons lemon or lime zest (optional)

Add these ingredients along with the others to the mixing bowl and blend until smooth.  Proceed as per the recipe above.  This bread does not need to be stored in the refrigerator although I would recommend you do this in warmer weather.  It should otherwise keep well for several days if stored at room temperature, in an airtight cake tin.

Macronutrient Profile
I have included macros for both the Coconut Bread and Sweet Coconut Bread recipes, using the ingredients specified above.

The macros for the sweet version do not include any extra additions such as fruit or chocolate.  They just include the addition of coconut oil and coconut sugar and other basic ingredients specified.

Coconut Protein Bread

Coconut Protein Bread

Sweet Coconut Protein Bread

Sweet Coconut Protein Bread

 

 

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Filed under All Recipe Posts, Breads & Quickbreads, Protein, Protein Bread, Special Diet

Banana Chocolate Protein Bars

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It’s time … remember I made those Strawberry Ripe protein bars a while ago, using freeze-dried fruit?  They are the bomb.

The thing with protein bars is that you really want to be able to pack them into your lunch box or bag or wherever you keep your snacks or post workout stuff when you are on the go.  That is what makes freeze-dried fruit so amazing.  You get a big flavour punch from whole fresh fruit (no additives) and all the goodness, but they’re not perishable as fresh fruit tends to be, right?  Plus, when ground into a powder, they help make the texture of your protein bar fantabulous and your bar can travel more safely with you.

There is mounting evidence on this blog of my love adoration worship of banana and chocolate together.  I know a lot of you share this love.  So here is one of my simple, fast, but absolutely yummilicious protein bars.  Nothing fancy, just a banana bar with some oats and a dollop of peanut butter, coated in 100% dark chocolatey goodness.

I have never tried it but I would guess you could substitute banana chips for the freeze-dried banana.  Or simply use a good quality banana flavoured whey protein, although you won’t really get that real banana flavour.  I’ve actually made these bars using only unflavoured whey as well as a combination of unflavoured and banana flavoured whey.  Both are great.  I did not add any sweetener as the banana is sweet enough for my taste.  If you use a flavoured whey, it will already be sweetened so take that into account.

The small amount of peanut butter in the bar does not give the bars a strong PB flavour.  If you want a stronger flavour you can add more but you will have to add more oats to balance out the texture and use less almond milk.  Alternatively, a small amount of peanut flour (if you can get it!!) would be great.

They are sticky but that’s what makes them so awesome when you eat them.  The texture is not dry.  They are delicious and almost creamy!  If you don’t like chocolate, finely chop up some dry roasted peanuts and roll the bars in that to coat them for a Banana PB bar.  Wow.

I love using Willie’s Cacao 100% Chef’s Cacao for this, especially the Madagascan Sambirano Superior.  But a good Pralus 100% or any good 85% plus bar will do.  The intensity of the thin chocolate coating with the banana protein filling is amazing.

If you love the idea but not the fruit, substitute another favourite freeze-dried fruit or even coconut.  Just remember that all these changes will impact the macros one way or another.

I hope you love these.  They are one of my favourite post workout bars.  I gave a piece to my father to see if he could tell it was a protein bar … he thought they were banana chocolates!

That has to be worth points on some scoreboard somewhere 😀

Store them in the refrigerator or even freeze them if you are so inclined.  Wrap them up and pop into your lunch or workout bag.  I love them straight from the fridge on a hot day.

Macros are included below.

Enjoy!

Banana PB Protein Bars_6027_wm_1x1

Makes 4 bars

Ingredients
40 grams freeze-dried banana* (I used Absolute Fruitz)
70 grams unflavoured or banana flavoured whey protein isolate**
30 grams rolled oats (gluten-free, if required)
25 grams 100% peanut butter (or peanut flour
20 – 30 millilitres almond milk (I used 30 ml.  You could also substitute coconut or other non-dairy milk)
40 grams 100% chocolate, for enrobing the bars (or q.b. … this is about what I used to coat them all over)
sweetener, to taste (optional)

*If you cannot get freeze-dried banana, try using banana chips!

**I’ve tried this with 70 grams of this one and a combination of 40 grams of this with 30 grams of this one.  The latter gave an extra banana oomph.  You could substitute with peanut butter flavoured whey, if you can get that too.

Directions
Place the freeze-dried banana in the bowl of a food processor and process until finely ground.  Add the whey and rolled oats, and process until the mixture is fine.

Add the peanut butter, almond milk, and sweetener (if using) and process until the mixture comes together.   It will be fairly sticky.  Toss in a little extra whey powder or oat or peanut flour, if required.  Cover and refrigerate until it firms up.  Divide the mixture into four equal portions and form into bars.   Alternatively, you can immediately divide the mixture into four equal portions and form in to bars and then place on a tray, lined with silicone paper, in the fridge until they firm up enough to coat.  A little trickier than doing it the other way round but it’s up to you.

Place the dark chocolate into a microwave-safe plastic bowl and microwave for about one minute.  It might need another 15 seconds or so.  Stir the mixture until melted.  Keep stirring the mixture as it cools slightly.  You can also melt the chocolate in a heatproof bowl over simmering water (a bain marie).  Once melted, remove from the heat and stir until it cools slightly.

Dip or coat each bar in the chocolate and set on to a tray, lined with silicone paper, to set completely.  You can set the bars at room temperature or place in the refrigerator for ten minutes or so until the chocolate sets.

Now, you can temper the chocolate and coat the bars for a shiny finish with a nice snap to the coating, if you are like me and prefer them this way.  To do this, I generally temper a large quantity of chocolate and use a dipping fork to dip and coat the bars.  I still end up having used about 40 grams of chocolate, as you only need a think layer of chocolate.

Store them in an airtight container in the fridge.  They are great straight from the fridge.  Wrap well if packing into a lunch box or gym bag.

Banana PB Protein Bars_6039_wm_4x5

Macronutrient Profile
I’ve included macros based on the recipe as stated and using the ingredients I specified above.  If you make variations to the bars, you will have to account for those, of course.

Banana PB Protein Bars_macros

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Filed under All Recipe Posts, Chocolate, Protein, Protein Bars, Special Diet

Fresh Mint Protein Gelato

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When I posted a recipe for a fresh mint and chocolate chunk ice cream, I was blown away by how many of you really love chocolate and mint ice cream, even just mint ice cream on its own!  How good is it when you infuse the milk and cream with fresh mint, hey?  A whole other realm of heaven compared with using peppermint extract!

Well, the excitement lead to a lot of excellent questions of the “will you make a protein version?” variety.  Plus, I got a huge nudge from a few lads armed with ice cream makers 🙂

So finally, I came around to thinking “Well, why not?”  It’s not as though I will be scoffing rich ice creams all summer and a proper protein gelato would be a lovely change from my usual protein desserts.  Yes, that’s right, proper protein gelato.  Not protein powder mixed with milk and gums or gelatine and whizzed in an ice cream maker.  Go ahead and do that, if you will, but don’t call it ice cream.  Not within earshot of me 😉

In the interests of never ever “making do” or “settling for a substitute” when it comes to healthy desserts, I’ve made a real gelato that is both high in protein and low in both carbohydrates and fat.  It is a gelato style ice cream (milk-based), is made using a traditional custard method, and has all the flavour and deliciousness of real ice cream as a result.  The only difference is that it doesn’t contain anything unhealthy and it’s actually good for you.

This gelato is good for you.   

I promise.

Sound the trumpets.   No, skip that rubbish.  Just go and make this gelato.   Play a fanfare and thank me later 😀

Mint is a great choice for a protein gelato as it doesn’t add any extra sugar or fat.  This recipe can be adapted to suit other flavours, according to your whim.  You can omit the mint and substitute with vanilla, spices, cacao, fruit puree, whatever.   Just be aware that in some instances, this will affect the macros and the texture of the gelato.  For example, fruit puree contains a lot of water so will make for a more icy texture.

A word about the role of sugar and fats in ice cream … Sugar not only lends sweetness to an ice cream.  It also helps develop and keep the ice cream’s creamy texture.  Fat also gives ice cream a more intense flavour, being a flavour carrier, as well as giving it a lush creamy texture and mouthfeel.  By omitting both, it is important to include the egg yolks, which also thicken the custard and create a creamier result.   I use micellar casein for ice creams as it is a natural thickening agent and helps promote a richer, creamier texture.   You will not get this by using whey.  So, with all that in mind, this ice cream is well armed to remain creamy and delicious, despite the lack of the usual ingredients required to make it so, or with the addition of gums or gelatine.

You can substitute a non-dairy milk for this recipe very easily.  However,  I would not recommend a vegan protein powder.

Serve it immediately for a softer, gelato style dessert.  If you prefer a firmer ice cream, freeze it for an hour or two.  This gelato is best eaten fresh, soon after it is made.  The addition of protein powder to ice cream will change the texture of the ice cream if stored for long periods.  It’s still lovely, but definitely at its best in the first few hours.  As a result, the quantity made in this recipe will allow for 4-6 small serves or 2-3 large serves.

You really can’t tell the difference between this gelato and the original recipe, here.  Because this is real gelato.  I call that a win.  No.  I’m feeling a bit like a legend right now 😉

Enjoy, protein peeps!    Yes, yes, macros are provided below.  They’re fantastic … better than fantastic … shoo, go make gelato, now!

Makes 600 grams / Serves 4 – 6 (100-150 grams per serve)

Ingredients
500 millilitres skim milk
10 grams fresh mint leaves (peppermint, spearmint, whatever)
2 large egg yolks
2 large eggs (59 grams in the shell)
125 grams Natvia (or similar low-calorie sweetener like Splenda, Truvia, or Nu Via)*
60 grams Micellar Casein (I used Professional Whey MPI)**

Optional:
20 grams 100% chocolate, chopped

*You could use pure stevia extract for this recipe, however, I have found that it imparts an odd flavour in ice creams and prefer not to use it.  If you do, start with about 1/8 teaspoon and work your way up from there.  I can’t vouch for the result though.  I use a granulated stevia blend for this recipe as I have found it to work extremely well in producing a good flavour and texture.

**I use unflavoured casein.  If you prefer to use a mint or choc-mint flavoured casein, go right ahead!  Remember, though, that flavoured protein powder will have gums and sweetener added.  The gums will add to the texture of the ice cream, which is good.  You will have to adjust down the amount of sweetener you add though.

Directions
The first step is to infuse the milk with the mint.  I prefer an overnight infusion, but you will get a great flavour in a minimum of about two hours.  Wash the mint leaves if required and gently pat dry on paper towels or a clean dish towel.  Place into a bowl or jug and pour over the milk.  Cover with cling film and refrigerate for a minimum of two hours and up to eight hours or overnight.

Combine the egg yolks, eggs, and sweetener in a bowl and whisk until light and creamy.   Transfer the milk and mint mixture to a saucepan over a low to medium heat.  Bring to simmering point and then slowly strain the mixture into the egg mixture, whisking continuously.  This can be tricky so you might find it easier to strain the cream into a jug or container and then add it in a slow stream to the eggs as you whisk.

Place the custard back into the saucepan and cook over a low heat until the custard thickens slightly.  Stir continuously and do not allow the mixture to boil.  I prefer to use a whisk for this as it helps prevent lumps forming as I whisk.  The custard will not thicken a great deal if using skim milk but this is OK.

Remove from the heat and transfer to a bowl, and place the bowl on or in an ice bath.  This will cool the custard quickly.  Whisk until cooled to barely warm to touch. Once cooled, add the micellar casein and mix well by whisking until smooth.  Cover and refrigerate for two to eight hours or overnight.  I left it overnight.  When ready, churn in an ice cream maker, according to the manufacturer’s instructions.   It took all of 20 minutes to achieve a creamy gelato texture.  If you want chocolate chunks added, chop the chocolate into uneven pieces.  I chop them quite small, but it’s up to you, about how you like your chocolate chunks distributed!  Fold the chocolate through the mint ice cream.

If you want a lovely gelato texture, serve immediately.  If you prefer a firmer ice cream, place into an airtight container and freeze for an hour or two until ready to serve.

If you do not have an ice-cream machine, place the custard into the freezer instead of the fridge.  When it’s partly frozen, remove and whisk briskly to distribute the ice crystals.  Return to the freezer and repeat 2 or 3 times until the ice-cream is well churned and ready.  At this point, fold in the chopped chocolate.  Serve or place into an airtight container and freeze until ready to serve.

If you prefer, omit the chocolate and serve with a low fat, low carb chocolate sauce.  MMMM

Fresh Mint Protein Gelato_5981_wm_1x1

Ideas for Variations
Cheater’s Mint:  omit the fresh mint leaves and substitute with a little peppermint extract.  Use 1/8 teaspoon and adjust to suit your preference.  Add the extract to the egg mixture before adding the milk.  This is nowhere near as fantastic as the fresh mint infusion.

Vanilla:  omit the mint and add 1/2 to 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract, bean paste, or the beans scraped from 1/2 vanilla pod to the egg mixture before adding the milk.

Spiced:  Add 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon, or other spice mix.  This is also great with the chocolate, nuts, or the vanilla version.  A little chilli would be awesome with a chocolate version.  Just sayin’ 😉

Chocolate or Choc-Mint: Either leave in the mint or omit it, as desired.  Add 15 grams of pure cacao to the egg mixture and whisk until smooth, before adding the milk.    Add some chopped 100% chocolate for a chocolate chunk version.

Fruit:  Add up to 125 millilitres (1/2 metric cup) of pureed fresh fruit.  Be aware that this will create a slightly icier texture, unless you use a fleshy fruit such as banana.

PB or nuts:  Add some peanut butter or other nut butter, to taste.  This will increase both fat and carbs but also the protein content.  Or simply add some chopped dry roasted nuts to a vanilla, spiced, or chocolate version.

Macronutrient Profile
The macros provided here relate to the recipe as stated above, for both the plain mint and chocolate chunk versions.  Substitutions of other ingredients will change the macros, of course.  Please account for any changes you make, or ingredients you include.

Fresh Mint Protein Gelato_macros

Fresh Mint Gelato Version

Fresh Mint & Choc Chunk Protein Gelato_macros.jpg

Fresh Mint and Chocolate Chunk Version with 100% Chocolate

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Filed under All Recipe Posts, Protein, Protein Desserts, Protein Gelato, Special Diet

Gelato Panna e Amarene

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We always recall the truly memorable food moments in our lives with a smile and a longing to revisit the flavours, the textures, the sensory experience of that gastronomic interlude.  Sometimes we can, other times it must remain a sublime memory … perhaps associated with a special occasion, with people we love dearly, or places we have travelled to, that have left an imprint on our hearts.

Gelato is one of those things that can vividly recall happy foodie memories.   My fondest gelato memories always take me back to Italy.  I’ve had many great gelato moments in Italy and, not surprisingly, many of those involved variations on a chocolate flavour theme.  But perhaps one of the most memorable had nothing to do with chocolate.  It was at a particularly amazing gelateria in Piazza Navona in Rome … gelato made with fresh ingredients in a vast array of flavours, and no less than fifteen chocolate flavours to choose from.   Therein lay my dilemma.  Way too much chocolate choice (oh sure, try them all … 😉 ).  I couldn’t decide so I distracted myself by looking at the other flavours.  The thing with Italian gelaterie is that, whatever flavour experiments they come up with, the classic gelato flavours will always feature.  Pistachio, cioccolato, caffè, nocciola, limone, stracciatella, and panna e amarena.  Panna e amarena is a classic combination of a simple cream gelato swirled with sour cherry preserves, known as amarenata.  I’m not a fan of plain cream but oh I am a huge fan of amarenata.  I make my own every year.  You see this gelato everywhere but I’d never actually tried it.  It was wonderful.  So beautifully simple, with just a faint hint of vanilla in the creamy gelato, punctuated by the tart sweet cherry sauce and whole cherries swirled through it.   Perfection.

I’ve created a semifreddo version of this classic for Christmas.  Cherries always remind me of Christmas and it will complete a lovely Christmas trio of semifreddo style gelato I’m planning to serve with slices of pandoro on Christmas night.  This one, the Torroncino, and the Lebkucken spiced one.  There will be crushed up chunks of torrone and a rich ganache sauce spiked with Amaretto liqueur to serve alongside the gelato.  Not bad, yes?

The higher proportion of Italian meringue in this gelato makes it incredibly light and mousse-like in texture.   You can buy prepared amarenata or make your own.  It’s very simple to do, if you can find fresh or frozen morello cherries.  I have a simple recipe here.  Alternatively, you can make a sour cherry jam and swirl that through.  I’ve given a recipe for that below too.  I have not given exact quantities for swirling the cherry preserves through the gelato.  This is really up to you.  Both recipes for the sour cherry preserves make more than enough.  Leftovers are fantastic and can be kept refrigerated for several weeks.

It makes a pretty gelato to serve at Christmas and it matches the flavour of a classic nougat and chocolate perfectly.  Then again, it is also wonderful scooped in to a bowl or atop a waffle cone on a summer’s day … and pretend you’re sitting under a canopy in Piazza Navona and watching the world go by.  Bliss.

Panna e Amarena_5954_wm_1x1

Makes

Ingredients
Gelato Panna
3 large eggs, separated
90 grams sugar
20 grams vanilla sugar*
35 millilitres water
200 grams cream (35% fat), chilled
200 grams crème fraîche, chilled
Amarenata (recipe here) OR Conserva di Amarene (recipe below) q.b.
15 millilitres (1 tablespoon) Amaretto or Frangelico liqueur (optional)

*If you do not have vanilla sugar, replace the vanilla sugar with 20 grams of sugar and add one teaspoon of pure vanilla bean paste or extract.  I used the vanilla sugar to avoid adding colour to the gelato from the addition of vanilla beans.  However, this is purely my aesthetic preference and is not necessary.

Directions
Combine the sugars and water in a saucepan over a low-medium heat.  Let the sugar dissolve and bring to the boil.  Do not stir.  Place the egg whites in a bowl nearby.  Have the egg yolks ready in a separate bowl.

When the syrup has begun to boil watch it carefully.  Insert the candy thermometer in the syrup and wait until it reaches 115℃.  As you do this, beat the egg whites until they reach soft peak stage only.  When the syrup is ready, pour half of it in a thin and steady stream into the egg whites, as you continue to beat them on high-speed.  Set the remaining syrup aside, off the heat for now.  Continue beating the egg whites until they are glossy.  Set the meringue aside.

Return the syrup to the heat if required, just to melt it a little (it may start to form a skin and set if it cools).  Beat the egg yolks.  Pour the remaining syrup into the egg yolks in a thin steady stream as you beat them on high-speed.  Continue beating until the egg yolk mixture is light, tripled in volume, and has cooled.  In warm weather, or simply if you prefer, set the bowl in a larger bowl with an ice bath.  It will help to cool the egg mixture more quickly.

Make sure the cream is chilled.  Place the cream and crème fraîche in a large bowl.  Whisk until thickened slightly and the cream forms soft peaks.  Do not over-whisk the cream.

Gently fold the egg yolk mixture into the cream.  While you can be a little heavy-handed, you still want to keep the lightness of all that air we’ve beaten into the eggs.  Finally, gently fold in the meringue until no streaks remain.

Transfer the gelato to the prepared container or loaf pan.  Mix the amarenata or conserva and add the liqueur, if using.  Mix well.  Swirl some of the preserves into the gelato, with a light hand, making sure you swirl it about evenly.

Cover the gelato and freeze for 4 to 6 hours until set.  This semifreddo will never set hard and is very light and mousse-like.

It will keep for several days in the freezer, tightly covered.

Panna e Amarena_5947_wm_1x1

Conserva di Amarene
Ingredients
500 grams morello cherries, pitted weight (fresh or frozen)
250 grams sugar
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon (cassia bark)
1 teaspoon pure vanilla seeds or paste

Directions
Place all the ingredients into a heavy-based saucepan and mix.  If using fresh cherries, add about 50 millilitres of fresh water.  If using frozen cherries, there will be enough moisture as the cherries thaw and heat up, so extra water is not required.

Place over a low to medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the sugar is melted.  Bring to a simmer.  Cook until a small amount place on a chilled plate start to gel, or you can run a finger through it and it will leave a trail.  Remove from the heat and pour into clean jars and seal.  If you want to make this to use as jam, process the jars for about 45 minutes in boiling water.  Cool then store at room temperature.  When opened, they should be stored in the refrigerator.

Panna e Amarena_5949_wm_1x1

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Filed under All Recipe Posts, Fruit, Ice cream & Sorbet, Jams & Preserves, Special Diet

Cauliflower Protein Bread

Cauliflower Protein Bread_5936_wm_1x1

If you dislike cauliflower, I suggest you move right along … there is nothing for you in this post.  Don’t make this bread because you’ll be all “oh, I hate this bread.  I can taste cauliflower!”.    Well, yes, that’s kind of the point 😉  Perhaps scan through some past offerings on the blog and find another recipe you might like … because this post is all about cauliflower and its awesomeness as the basis for a healthy grain-free bread!  So, if you love your cauli, as do I, then read on … 🙂

Many of you know that there are some awesome cauliflower and cheese based pizza crust recipes on the interwebs.  There are also some related cauliflower bread recipes.  But here’s the thing.  I don’t like my bread to fall apart so I can’t slice it … and invariably, many of these do.  Because they’re mostly the pizza crust baked as a flat bread.  Taste great, but not very practical, unless you like to eat your bread with a spoon.  I do not.

So my challenge is, how do I make a cauliflower bread that is still mostly cauliflower and lovely and moist, and doesn’t rely on lots of added flour for structure and body.  My goal was to make a cauliflower bread that was low in both fat and carbs but high in protein and fibre and that allowed me to have my extra serve of vegetables in a different form.  I like variety.  I love protein breads.   It’s a gimme.

You don’t care about my craziness though … so here we go.   This bread is delicate, because it is like a serving of cauliflower in bread form.  When still warm, it’s lovely with a little butter melting into it.  Yum.  So much for the low-fat criteria … 😀  It’s obviously great with cheese and pickles, but also served alongside soup, or any meat or vegetarian based meal.

I have added a little Grana Padano (or you could use Parmigiano Reggiano) but please use the real thing.  There aren’t many things as horrible as faux Parmigiano cheese.   Alternatively, use a little really sharp cheddar or other hard cheese.   The subtle but sharp hint of the Parmigiano is great with cauliflower.  I’ve also added a little chilli to my bread.  Then again, I like to add chilli to almost everything.  Honestly, the possibilities are huge.  You can add some smoked or sweet paprika, finely chopped fresh herbs, or finely sliced olives … pretty much whatever you like.  Keep it simple though as too much clutter in your bread makes it difficult to slice and less versatile.  You will also tire of it very quickly.  Keep it simple.

A serving of two slices (based on twelve slices per loaf) will yield about 110kcals, 15.1g protein, a low 2.7g fat (1.4g sat), only 5.1g carbohydrates (2.7g sugars), and a whopping 4.2g of dietary fibre.  I dare you to hate those macros!

This bread is naturally gluten and tree nut free.  While it is not low FODMAP, if you do not have an issue with galactose or lactose, then it is OK for you too.  If you prefer to make it dairy free, or do not use protein powder, substitute the protein powder with extra coconut flour instead as indicated in the recipe.

It bakes up well as a loaf but you could also make this as mini loaves or muffins so you don’t have to slice them up.

Enjoy!

Cauliflower Protein Bread_5933_wm_1x1

Makes 1 x 21cm x 10cm loaf or 12 muffin-sized breads

Ingredients

  • 575 grams chopped cauliflower (about 1 medium cauliflower)
  • 25 grams coconut flour
  • 45 grams unflavoured micellar casein* (substitute whey or rice protein isolate or 30 grams coconut flour)
  • 25 grams Grana Padano or Reggiano cheese, grated
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 1 large egg (52 grams, shelled)
  • 198 grams liquid egg whites (about 6 large egg whites)
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon chilli, smoked paprika, roasted garlic, or some finely chopped fresh herbs (optional)

*You can omit the casein powder if you like and just add another 25 grams of coconut flour.

Directions
Preheat the oven to 200℃.

Line the loaf tin with non-stick silicone paper.  It pays to use a double thickness of paper for this.  Set aside.

Place the cauliflower in to the bowl of a food processor.  Pulse a few times, until chopped finely.  It will resemble cauliflower rice.   Add the remaining ingredients and pulse until smooth.  If you are adding chilli, paprika, garlic, or herbs, to the bread, add them with the other ingredients.  Adjust the seasoning, if desired.

Transfer to the prepared tin and smooth the top.  If you prefer to sprinkle some chilli or herbs on top, do it now.

Lower the oven temperature to 190℃ and bake the bread for 10 minutes.  Reduce the temperature to 180℃ and bake for a further 50 minutes, or until risen and golden and cooked through.

Remove from the oven and cool on a wire rack, in the tin.  When cool, carefully remove the bread, and serve.

Store, wrapped in foil in a freezer bag, in the refrigerator.   It will keep fresh for several days if stored this way.

Cauliflower Protein Bread_5939_wm_1x1

Macronutrient Profile

I have provided macros as per the recipe above.  If you substitute other ingredients, you will have to account for these changes.  Further, you will have to account for any extra ingredients you add to the bread, in terms of flavourings.

Cauliflower Protein Bread_macros

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Filed under All Recipe Posts, Protein, Protein Bread, Savouries, Special Diet